Sunday, February 26, 2006

VPTC Tech Awards 2006: Honoring Technology Developments in Central Virginia

VPTC 8th Annual Tech Awards Dinner
Thursday, May 11, 2006, Farmington Country Club, Charlottesville, VA
Tickets - $100 for members and $130 for guests
RSVP Online

Join the Virginia Piedmont Tech Council (VPTC) at its 8th annual Tech Awards dinner, the annual showcase event that honors individuals and organizations who's technology developments are turning the nations investment spotlight on our region and our market. Companies are recognized that have made successful innovations, and a special award is presented to acknowledge the contribution of an area educator who creatively uses technology in the classroom. Select sponsorship opportunities remain available. All event details can be found at the VPTC Tech Awards Website

This year’s keynote speaker, Terry Sharrer, Ph.D., Curator of Health Sciences at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, will talk about innovations in healthcare from an unlikely source – the Amish. His talk "Catching up with Horse and Buggy Medicine" will share the experiences of patients of the Clinic for Special Children in Strasburg, PA. Here Amish and Old Order Mennonite children arrive by horse and buggy to access 21st century molecular medicine and receive life saving interventions. If similar medicine were practiced by today's hospitals, there would be substantial benefits in terms of cost savings and improved outcomes. Learn more about how all Americans could follow this unique cost-effective and accessible model of healthcare practiced by the Plain People.

For more information contact Gail Milligan at 434-817-6303 or visit

About the Keynote Speaker
Terry Sharrer is the Curator of Health Sciences at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, where he has worked for thirty-six years. He speaks and writes about a range of life science subjects, specializing in genetic technology. He has done video documentaries on the Human Genome Project, the beginning of gene therapy, and the molecular biology of cancer. He holds a PhD in history from the University of Maryland, has authored some three dozen publications, and currently is writing a history of molecular medicine. He is involved in the community via the National Foundation for Cancer Research, the Immune Deficiency Foundation, and various other organizations. With his wife Patty, and sons Alex, age 13, and Nicholas, age 17, he lives in Hamilton, Loudoun County, VA.

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